Tooth Eruption Chart in Babies and Adults – Dental Care Experts

Dental Care Experts

Tooth Eruption Chart in Babies and Adults

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Today we’re going to write a simple and short blog post about tooth eruption chart in babies and adults. You might find this post useful if you need this for your assignment in class, or you are simply curious about your baby’s teeth development.

As you might have already known, there are two stages of development in human’s teeth. The first one is the primary teeth (often called baby teeth or deciduous teeth),  and the second one is the permanent teeth in adults.

Primary / Baby Tooth Eruption Chart

Although babies are considered toothless, but they actually already have a set of teeth, even before they are in their 6 months age. However, these teeth slowly emerge during the first two years and a half of their life.

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Interestingly, girls grow their tooth earlier than boys, and the lower teeth usually erupt before the upper teeth. In average, every six months there are around 4 teeth eruption, and the cycle is usually completed when the child is 3 years old.

Here’s the tooth eruption chart in babies, based on the American Dental Association:

Baby Teeth Development Chart (upper jaw)

Teeth (Upper Jaw) Emerged Fall Out
Central incisor 8 to 12 months 6 to 7 years
Lateral incisor 9 to 13 months 7 to 8 years
Canine 16 to 22 months 10 to 12 years
First molar 13 to 19 months 9 to 11 years
Second molar 25 to 33 months 10 to 12 years

 

Baby Teeth Development Chart (lower jaw)

Teeth (Lower Jaw) Emerged Fall Out
Central incisor 6 to 10 months 6 to 7 years
Lateral incisor 10 to 16 months 7 to 8 years
Canine 17 to 23 months 10 to 12 years
First molar 14 to 18 months 9 to 11 years
Second molar 23 to 31 months 10 to 12 years
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Permanent Tooth Eruption Chart in Adults

In adults, the teeth start to erupt when they are 6 years old. The development spans through several years, with the notorious wisdom teeth eruption marks the end of the cycle. In some people, the wisdom teeth don’t erupt at all, while in some other people the wisdom teeth erupt partially or completely. This is determined by the amount of space available in the jaw area. People with smaller jaw often experience wisdom teeth that grow in an angle, which might cause impacted wisdom teeth. Dentists often recommend removing the wisdom teeth if it potentially cause trouble in the future.

The American Dental Association (ADA) released the eruption chart in adults as follow:

Permanent Teeth Development Chart (upper jaw)

Permanent Teeth (upper jaw) Emerged
Central incisor 7-8 Years
Lateral incisor 8-9 Years
Canine 11-12 Years
First premolar 10-11 Years
Second premolar 10-12 Years
First molar 6-7 Years
Second molar 12-13 Years
Wisdom teeth (third molar) 17-21 Years

 

Permanent Teeth Development Chart (lower jaw)

Permanent Teeth (upper jaw) Emerged
Central incisor 6-7 Years
Lateral incisor 7-8 Years
Canine 9-10 Years
First premolar 10-11 Years
Second premolar 11-12 Years
First molar 6-7 Years
Second molar 11-13 Years
Wisdom teeth (third molar) 17-21 Years

 

Note: It is important to remember that these baby and permanent tooth eruption charts only describes the average age when the teeth are emerged.

 

 

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